KEYLIME PODCAST #164: Big #MedEd Needs Big Ideas

Jon chose to discuss this paper because he was fascinated by the innovation of the authors in developing a new instructional method – automated, kiosk teaching. The authors were faced with a challenge of training 200 million people in 10 years. Can you even begin to comprehend the scale of their teaching challenge? . Read on, and check out the podcast here (or on iTunes!)

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KeyLIME Session 164:

Listen to the podcast.

Read the episode abstract here.

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Chang MP1, Gent LM2, Sweet M2, Potts J2, Ahtone J3, Idris AH4. A novel educational outreach approach to teach Hands-Only Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation to the public. Resuscitation. 2017 Jul;116:22-26. Epub 2017 Apr 29.

Reviewer: Jon Sherbino (@sherbino)

Background

This is (IMO) the weirdest paper we have reviewed on KeyLIME. It’s about cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Now, when my kids have the misfortune of hearing snippets of the KeyLIME podcast in the car with me, they have pretended to drop dead from boredom, perhaps necessitating CPR for revival. However, the chest “compressions” that I threatened to perform on them if they did not stop mocking me did not adhere to the current clinical guidelines for high quality CPR. This is as close as I can link CPR to KeyLIME. I chose this paper because I was fascinated by the innovation of the authors in developing a new instructional method – automated, kiosk teaching. The authors were faced with a challenge of training 200 million people in 10 years. Can you even begin to comprehend the scale of their teaching challenge?

So, if you want to hear about a novel instructional method that attempts to tackle a teacher capacity problem, keep reading.

Purpose

To evaluate a new approach to cardiopulmonary resuscitation instruction using a self-instructional kiosk to teach Hands-Only CPR to people at a busy international airport.

Type of Paper

Report of an innovation – prospective observational program evaluation

Key Points on Method

A single, self-instructional kiosk was set up in the Dallas-Fort Worth Airport, the 10th busiest airport in the world with more than 64M passengers moving through it in 2015. The kiosk includes a touch screen computer and a partial task trainer (e.g. CPR manikin) that provides real-time feedback on the quality of skill performance. There is no active recruitment of participants and no staffing of the kiosk, which is open 24 hours a day. A participant watches a one-minute video, practices CPR for 30 seconds while following a video, then completes a simulated CPR test and receives feedback via a score on various performance criteria.

The kiosk captures usage data and performance data. No participant data is captured.

The kiosk was piloted in the cafeteria of American Airlines for 6 months to allow refinement of the instructional method.

Institutional REB was exempted.

The other elements of the methods are not relevant to our emphasis on a novel instructional method (and are particular to cardiopulmonary resuscitation research.)


Key Outcomes

During a 32 month period (July 2013 to February 2016) there were more than 23 thousand visits with 38% occurring in the morning.

94% of participants reviewed the video once. 9000 participants (38%) completed the practice session. 52% of participants who completed the practice session did not complete the testing session. If a practice session was completed, the average number of attempts was one; if a testing

session was completed, the average number of attempts was two. The highest number of attempts at testing in a single session was 28.

Nearly 1700 (19%) participants had a test score greater than 70%.

Key Conclusions

The authors conclude…

“There is noticeable public interest in learning Hands-Only CPR by using an airport kiosk and an airport is an opportune place to engage a layperson in learning Hands-Only CPR. The average quality of Hands-Only CPR by the public needs improvement and adding kiosks to other locations in the airport could reach more people and could be replicated in other major airports in the United States.”

As a proof-of-concept, automated learning works for simple skills with wide appeal and a large audience. More then half of engaged learners do not want to complete a test. Skill decay is not addressed by this instructional method.

Spare Keys – other take home points for clinician educators

The savvy reader will note that American Airlines was one of the institutions supporting an author of this study. This is a little reminder that collaborations with for-profit organizations can be ethical and viable. Researchers should think broadly about potential partnerships.

 

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