Category: KeyLIME

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#KeyLIMEPodcast 83: Reflection in #Meded

The Key Literature in Medical Education podcast discusses reflection – a perennial hot topic of discussion in health professions education.  While we all have an intuitive understanding of what reflection is, we lack a common language or framework in describing reflection.  The paper this week addresses this gap.  Keep reading for more info… or start listening for even better info. Download the podcast from iTunes here.

If you have a paper that you would like to see discussed on a future episode of KeyLIME leave a comment below.

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KeyLIME Session 83 – Article under review:
Fri post_KeyLIME (Dr. Padmos)

Listen to the podcast

View/download the abstract here.

Nguyen QD, Fernandez N, Karsenti T, Charlin B. What is reflection? A conceptual analysis of major definitions and a proposal of a five-component model. Medical Education, Dec 2014, 48(12): 1176-89

Reviewer: Jonathan Sherbino

Background
When I started grad school, the first book I picked up was Donald Schon’s Educating the Reflective Practitioner*. It was a great place to start for a career in health professions education.  The book challenged educators to

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#KeyLIMEPodcast 82: Educational Imprinting & the Geography of Destiny Part 2

This week’s Key Literature in Medical Education podcast builds on the theme of educational imprinting from KeyLIME Episode 80.

As Clinician Educators, we must remain mindful of the profound and persistent influence of the culture of residency training on future practice.

Check out the abstract below for more details.  Subscribe to the podcast for better details.

  • Jonathan

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KeyLIME Session 82 – Article under review:
Fri post_KeyLIME

Listen to the podcast

View/download the abstract here.

Chen C1, Petterson S2, Phillips R3, Bazemore A2, Mullan F1. Spending patterns in region of residency training and subsequent expenditures for care provided by practicing physicians for Medicare beneficiaries. JAMA 2014, 312 (22):2385-93

Reviewer: Jason Frank

Background
Previously on KeyLIME, we reviewed Asch’s paper that suggested that “geography is destiny”, and where you train a health professional can determine their lifelong competence trajectory. This remains a controversial premise today, and further data is needed.  Enter Chen et al in the JAMA 2014 Med Ed theme issue, who looked at